ReadWorks Answers Key 2022 [FREE ACCESS]

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ReadWorks Answer Key

ReadWorks Answers Key – All Grades Unlocked

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ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade K

Below you can find answers for Grade K topics:

Twin Tricks

Q1. Who are Raya and Letitia?… Ans: A
Q2. How can the twins confuse people?… Ans: A
Q3. What trick do Raya and Letitia play on their parents?… Ans: B
Q4. How do Raya and Letitia’s parents tell them apart at dinner?… Ans: B
Q5. What do Letitia and Raya do when their mom gives them each dessert? They both get upset and say they want _… Ans: the other one
Q6. What did you learn from “Twin Tricks”?… Ans: This passage is all about two alike twin sisters who have the same brown eyes, the same dark hair & the same size as well, and who loves to trick others even their parents.
Q7. Draw a picture of Jane Goodall studying chimpanzees… Ans: Refer to Google images here

Jane Goodall

Q1. Who is Jane Goodall?… Ans: A
Q2. What did Jane Goodall help us learn about?… Ans: A
Q3. What can chimpanzees use to catch insects?… Ans: B
Q4. What do chimpanzees use sounds for?… Ans: A
Q5. Where did Jane go to study chimpanzees?Jane studied chimpanzees in __… Ans: Africa
Q6. What did you learn from “Jane Goodall”?… Ans: According to Wikipedia, Jane Goodall is world’s foremost expert on chimpanzees, Goodall is best known for her 60-year study of social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees since she first went to Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania in 1960, where she witnessed human-like behaviours amongst chimpanzees, including armed conflict.
Q7. Draw a picture of Jane Goodall studying chimpanzee… Ans: Refer to Google images here

Seminole Houses

Q1. Where did Seminoles live long ago?… Ans: B
Q2. What are Seminole houses called?… Ans: B
Q3. What kind of houses are Chickees?… Ans: A
Q4. How did Seminoles build Chickees?… Ans: A
Q5. Why were Chickees good for the hot and rainy weather in Florida? Chickees were good because they kept the Seminole… Ans: Cool & dry
Q6. What did you learn from “Seminole Houses?”… Ans: The Seminoles were a Native American tribe who lived in what is now Florida. They started living there around the late 1700s and early 1800’s when they first arrived. They used to live in a specially built house called Chickees.
Q7. Draw a picture of a Chickee… Ans: Refer to Google images here

Continents

Q1. What do we call a big chunk of land?… Ans: A
Q2. How many continents does the earth have?… Ans: B
Q3. Which is one of the seven continents?… Ans: A
Q4. The continents weren’t always spread apart. What did they use to be?… Ans: B
Q5. What did the seven continents use to be a part of?… Ans: The seven continents used to be a part of one huge chunk of land.
Q6. What did you learn from “Continents”?… Ans: There are seven continents on Earth: Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Europe, Oceania, and Antarctica. Each continent has its own unique geography, climate, & wildlife.
Q7. Draw the continents when they were one huge chunk of land… Ans: Refer to Google images here

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 1

Below you can find answers for Grade 1 topics:

Lost & Found

Q1. What kind of pet does Verónica have?… Ans: C
Q2. Who are the two characters looking for Bombón in this story?… Ans: C
Q3. ‘Let’s be quiet. Maybe we will hear him,’ said Mami…What do you know about Verónica and her mom based on this?… Ans: A
Q4. What is this text mostly about?… Ans: A
Q5. Where does Verónica put Bombón’s favorite treat?… Ans: She puts the treat by the hole.
Q6. What did you learn from the text “Lost and Found?”?… Ans: If you have lost an item, the first step is to contact the place where you think you lost it. If you lost it at a restaurant, for example, call and speak to the manager. If you lost it at a store, speak to an employee or manager there.
Q7. Class Discussion Question: Where does Verónica get the idea to put Bombón’s favorite treat by the hole in the wall?… Ans: She gets this idea from her own memory of moving into this apartment. Her dad cooked her favorite food and it made the new apartment feel more comfortable.
Q8. Draw a picture of Veronica and her pet… Ans: Refer to Google images here

Percussion Instruments

Q1. What is tempo?… Ans: C
Q2. This text lists several percussion instruments. Which of these instruments is a percussion instrument?… Ans: A
Q3. Read these sentences about percussion instruments:“Boom! Bang! Ding! Clang! Crash…Based on this information, what do we know about percussion instrument sounds?… Ans: B
Q4. What is “Percussion Instruments” mostly about?… Ans: C
Q5. What are percussion instruments made of?… Ans: Percussion instruments are made of wood, metal, or animal skin.
Q6. What did you learn from “Percussion Instruments”?… Ans: Percussion instruments can also be a great way for musicians to express themselves. Percussion instruments can be very loud and powerful, or they can be very delicate and nuanced. They can be used to create a wide range of emotions in music, from the heaviest of metal to the most delicate of classical pieces.
Q7. Class Discussion Question: Why do musicians play percussion instruments? Use information from the text to support your answer… Ans: There are many reasons why musicians might choose to play percussion instruments. Percussion instruments can add a lot of energy and excitement to music, and they can also be very versatile, providing a wide range of sounds and textures that other instruments might not be able to produce.
Q8. Draw any percussion instruments… Ans: Refer to Google images here

James Madison

Q1. Who was James Madison?… Ans: B
Q2. How does this text define the U.S. Constitution?… Ans: C
Q3. Read this sentence about James Madison: “James Madison is also remembered as the ‘Father of the Constitution…What does this tell us about who wrote the Constitution?… Ans: A
Q4. What is “James Madison” mostly about?… Ans: C
Q5. What did Madison love to learn about as a child?… Ans: When Madison was a child, he loved to learn about math, geography, and languages.
Q6. What did you learn from “James Madison”?… Ans: James Madison was one of the most influential Founding Fathers of the United States. He was the fourth President & best known for his role in drafting the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
Q7. Class Discussion Question: Why was James Madison an important person in the history of the United States of America? Use information from the text to support your answer…. Ans: James Madison was an important person in the history of the United States of America because he was hailed as the “Father of the Constitution” for his pivotal role in drafting and promoting the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
Q8. Draw a picture of James Madison…. Ans: Refer to Google images here

George Washington

Q1. Who was George Washington?… Ans: C
Q2. This text gives a sequence of events in George Washington’s life. What did Washington do first?… Ans: B
Q3. George Washington stopped being president of America before he died. What part of the passage tells us that this is true?… Ans: A
Q4. What is “George Washington” mostly about?… Ans: C
Q5. Who did the American colonists fight against in the American Revolutionary War?… Ans: In the American Revolutionary War, American colonists fought against the British.
Q6. What did you learn from “George Washington”?… Ans: George Washington was one of the most influential Founding Fathers of the United States. He served as the country’s first president, and his leadership helped shape the nation during its early years.
Q7. Class Discussion Question: Why was George Washington a very important man? Use information from the text to support your answer… Ans: George Washington was one of the most important figures in the American Revolutionary War. He served as the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and helped lead the war effort against the British. Washington also played a key role in the development of the United States Constitution and was elected as the first president of the country
Q8. Draw a picture of George Washington… Ans: Refer to Google images here

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 2

Below you can find answers for Grade 2 topics:

Wind Power

Q1. What is a windmill?… Ans: A
Q2. This text describes wind power in two different times. Which times are described in the article?… Ans: C
Q3. Long ago, farmers used windmills to pump water and make flour. Today, people build wind farms that produce a large amount of electricity.
What can you conclude based on this evidence?… Ans: C
Q4. Wind turbines have helped people get more power from the wind. What else has helped people get more power from the wind?… Ans C
Q5. What is the main idea of this article?… Ans: B
Q6. Read these sentences from the text: “Today, people have learned how to get much more power…Based on these sentences, what does it mean if something is “modern”?… Ans: B
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes this sentence… Ans: A
Q8. In the past, what did farmers use windmills to do?… Ans: They used windmills to pump water & make flour.
Q9. How do today’s wind turbines help bring light and power to homes and businesses?… Ans: They commonly use generators, which bring light and power to homes, farms, and all types of businesses.
Q10. To make progress means to get better in some way. How have we made progress in using wind power since the first windmills? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: We set up large wind turbines in groups known as wind farms to generate more power than a windmill. We also now use wind power to generate a great deal, which helps homes and businesses all across the land. This is a fantastic increase from when the farmer would merely use a windmill for a single task, for example, making use of water pumps, or perhaps generating flour.

Space Junk

Q1. What does space trash or space junk do?… Ans: Space junk can damage working satellites. It can also hit old satellites and break them apart, creating more space junk. [paragraphs 1, 2]
Q2. Why is it difficult to track pieces of debris in space?… Ans: Tracking pieces of debris in space is difficult because working satellites and debris move very fast and in different directions.
Q3. Based on the passage, what do scientists from around the world agree on?… Ans: Scientists from around the world agree that they need to reduce the amount of new space junk. [paragraph 4]
Q4. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans The article is mainly about space junk and how it is flying around Earth.
Q5. The question below is an incomplete sentence. Choose the word that best completes the sentence…space debris can damage satellites, _ scientists are trying to get rid of it… Ans: C

China and Silk

Q1. What do insects called silkworms make?… Ans: B
Q2. What does the text describe? … Ans: C
Q3. Read the following sentences from the text: Based on this information, why was a set of trade routes connecting China and the West called the Silk Road?… Ans: C
Q4. In ancient China, raising silkworms helped some people make money. How did raising silkworms help some people make money?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: B

Haiku

Q1. What is a haiku?… Ans: B
Q2. What does the text describe? … Ans: B
Q3. Please read these sentences from the text:… Ans: C
Q4. How can the two haikus provided in the text best be compared?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: C

Santiago

Q1. What is Santiago?… Ans: B
Q2. The text describes a sequence of important events in Santiago’s history. What happened in Santiago after Chile won its independence from Spain in the 1800s? … Ans: C
Q3. Read the following sentences:…Based on this information, what can you conclude about Santiago? Ans: A
Q4. Based on the text, when did Santiago grow a lot?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of the text?… Ans: C

Honeybees

Q1. What do honeybees make that people eat?… Ans: C
Q2. The text describes how honeybees help plants by moving pollen from flower to flower. What does moving pollen do for plants?… Ans: B
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. What can you conclude from these sentences? Ans: C
Q4. Read these sentences from the text. Why might people be worried that there have been fewer honeybees?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: B

Flag Day

Q1. What does Flag Day celebrate?… Ans: C
Q2. What does the text describe?… Ans: B
Q3. People celebrate both the American flag and the United States on Flag Day. What evidence from the text supports this statement?… Ans: A
Q4. What did the United States flag look like right before the last two states joined the country?… Ans: C
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: A

Louis Armstrong

Q1. Who is Louis Armstrong?… Ans: B
Q2. What does the text describe?… Ans: A
Q3. Read the following sentences from the text:Ans: B
Q4. Based on the text, what can you conclude about Louis Armstrong’s talents?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: C

Groundhog Day

Q1. What happens every year on February 2nd across America?… Ans: B
Q2. What does the text describe?… Ans: A
Q3. The start of spring can’t really be predicted based on whether a groundhog sees its shadow on February 2nd. What evidence from the text supports this statement? Ans: C
Q4. The title of this text is “Groundhog Day.” Based on the information in the text, what is Groundhog Day?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: C

The United States Constitution

Q1. What is the United States Constitution?… Ans: A
Q2. Part of the text describes the sequence of events that ended with the Constitution becoming the law of the land. After men met at Independence Hall and wrote the Constitution, what happened next?… Ans: B
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. What can you conclude based on this evidence? Ans: A
Q4. The states had to vote for the Constitution to become the law of the land. The Constitution says that people must vote for a president every four years.… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this article? … Ans: A

Weathering and Erosion

Q1. What is erosion? …Ans: A
Q2. Weathering and erosion are effects. What can cause weathering and erosion?… Ans: B
Q3. Weathering and erosion wear down rocks over a long time. What evidence in the text supports this statement? … Ans: C
Q4. Read this paragraph from the article. What can you infer from this paragraph about the strength of wind and how fast it wears down rocks?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: B
Q6. Read this paragraph from the article. Why does the author ask the question, “Have you ever seen waves crash against rocks on the shore?” … Ans: C
Q7. A sheet of ice on a mountain can cause weathering and erosion _ it moves down the mountain.… Ans: A
Q8. What is the definition of a natural event?… Ans: A natural event is a change in nature.
Q9. What happens to rocks on the shore of a beach when they are hit by moving water?… Ans: At a minimum, students should respond that the water chips away small pieces of the rocks. Students may add that those pieces become smaller and smaller, and can eventually turn into sand.
Q10. Imagine a beach with big waves and several large rocks along its shore. What might change about that beach in five hundred years? Support your answer with evidence from the article…. Ans: Answers may vary but should discuss the effect of weathering and erosion on the rocks. Over five hundred years, the waves would have chipped off pieces of the rocks. Therefore, the rocks on the beach would be smaller, and parts of them may have turned into sand.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 3

Below you can find answers for Grade 3 topics:

A Special Birthday

Q1. Why does Gina’s grandmother come to visit Gina’s family all the way from Korea? …Ans: B
Q2. How does Gina’s grandmother describe the one-year birthday celebration in Korean culture?… Ans: D
Q3. Read the following sentences from the text. Based on this evidence, what conclusion can you draw about the baby’s first-birthday game? … Ans: B
Q4. Before her sister’s party, the dog takes the fortune items. How does Gina solve this problem?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: C

Gold Rush

Q1. Where did Terry Herbert find treasure?… Ans: D
Q2. How does the author describe the treasure that Terry Herbert found?… Ans: C
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. Based on this evidence, what can you conclude about the Anglo-Saxons?… Ans: B
Q4. What can be inferred from the text?… Ans: A
Q5. What would be another good title for this text?… Ans: B
Q6. Read this sentence from the text. What does the word collection most nearly mean in this sentence? … Ans: D
Q7. Choose the word that best completes the sentence. Researchers are searching the farm where the hoard was found __ they want to be sure all the treasure has been collected..… Ans: C
Q8. Describe how Terry Herbert found the treasure using evidence from the text. … Ans: Terry Herbert found the treasure using a metal detector, which is a piece of equipment that beeps when it is waved near metal.
Q9. How did the experts likely figure out that the treasure originally belonged to the Anglo-Saxons?… Ans: The experts probably figured out that the treasure originally belonged to the Anglo-Saxons by looking at the different artifacts and comparing them to other artifacts known to belong to Anglo-Saxons. For example, experts knew that Anglo-Saxon swords had hilts, and they found a sword hilt among the treasure that Terry Herbert found.

Elizabeth Freeman

Q1. Where was Elizabeth Freeman, or Bett, born?… Ans: B
Q2. What event caused Bett to think she must have the right to be free?… Ans: B
Q3. Read the following sentences from the text. What conclusion can you draw from this evidence about Bett’s character?… Ans: D
Q4. How do Bett’s actions show that one person can make a big impact?… Ans: C
Q5. What is the main idea of this text? … Ans: D

Kinkajous

Q1. Where do kinkajous live?…Ans: C
Q2. In the text, the author describes kinkajous’ tails and how they use them. What is one way a kinkajou uses its tail?… Ans: A
Q3. Kinkajous are very noisy animals. What evidence from the passage supports this conclusion?… Ans: D
Q4. Why do kinkajous have the scientific name Potos flavus, which means golden drinker?… Ans: C
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: A
Q6. Please read the following sentence from the text. “Their loud screeches and barks echo throughout the forest, which makes them sound like a woman crying.”Based on this sentence, what does the word screeches mean? … Ans: B
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below._ kinkajous are small in size, their tails are longer than their heads and bodies combined!… Ans: A
Q8. Why do kinkajous need excellent balance?… Ans: Kinkajous need excellent balance in order to stay safe as they look for food in trees.
Q9. Why are kinkajous sometimes called “honey bears?”… Ans: Students may write that kinkajous like to steal honey from beehives.
Q10. Imagine your friend just got a pet kinkajou. What advice or information would you give your friend about kinkajous to help them handle their new pet? Support your answer with details from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the text. Students may write that Kinkajous might like to live in a cage or enclosure where they could climb and hang by their tails. In nature, they look for their preferred foods (honey and nectar) in rainforest trees. So, pet kinkajous might like to eat honey. Kinkajous are active and make loud noises at night; they are nocturnal. At night, pet kinkajous should be as far away as possible from where people in the house are sleeping.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 4

Below you can find answers for Grade 4 topics:

Walking Tall

Q1. Why were some schools still segregated in 1960 even though the Supreme Court had ruled that segregation was unconstitutional in 1954? Ans: B
Q2. What does the author describe in the beginning of the passage?… Ans: C
Q3. Many people did not want Ruby Bridges to attend William Frantz Public School. What evidence from the passage best supports this conclusion? Ans: C
Q4. Why did parents probably pull their children out of school after Ruby Bridges arrived?… Ans: A
Q5. What is this passage mostly about … Ans: C
Q6. Read the following sentence: “With the marshals surrounding her, the 6-year-old walked into the school and into history books.”… Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below.… Ans: D
Q8. Segregated means that people are separated by race. Public schools, drinking fountains, and public restrooms were segregated…. Ans: Segregated means that people are separated by race. Public schools, drinking fountains, and public restrooms were segregated.
Q9. Why did Congress award the Little Rock Nine the Congressional Gold Medal in 1999?… Ans: Congress awarded the Little Rock Nine the Congressional Gold Medal for their bravery in attempting to attend classes at an all-white high school, despite the many people who tried to prevent them from entering.
Q10. The passage states that high school was “far from easy” for the Little Rock Nine. Using evidence from the passage, explain why this may have been true.… Ans: When the nine African American students in Little Rock, Arkansas, tried to begin classes at an all-white high school, the governor of Arkansas and angry mobs surrounded the school to prevent the students from entering. It was not until President Dwight D. Eisenhower, sent U.S. troops to protect the students that they were allowed to begin classes. So, high school was probably “far from easy” because neither the governor of the state nor the community wanted the students at the school.

Immigration

Q1. How many waves of immigration to the United States does the text describe? Ans: B
Q2. According to the text, there were strong anti-immigration sentiments in America by the late 1800s. One cause of this was that people already living in America feared the newcomers would take away their jobs. What was one effect of this anti-immigration sentiment?… Ans: C
Q3. Sometimes there were cultural differences between the people already living in America and immigrants who had moved to America. What information from the text best supports this information?… Ans: B
Q4. How can the United States’ attitude toward immigrants during the late 1800s best be described?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the text mainly about?… Ans: A
Q6. Read the following sentences from the text:… Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence.… Ans: D
Q8. According to the text, what might be one reason an immigrant would move to the United States?… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the text. For example, students may note that immigrants might move to the United States to escape the dangers present in their home countries.
Q9. Describe two of the laws mentioned in the text. Make sure to address why these laws were passed.… Ans: Answers may vary but students should accurately describe any two of the laws mentioned in the text.
Q10. Explain at least one factor that influenced the American people’s opinion about immigration in the late 1800s. Use information from the text to support your answer.… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the text. For example, students may communicate that people’s sense of job security impacted their view of immigration. People began to fear that the newcomers would take their jobs. This contributed to the anti-immigration sentiment marking this time period.

Strangler Figs

Q1. What is an epiphyte?… Ans: C
Q2. This passage describes strangler figs and their role in the rainforest. What is one-way strangler figs are good for the rainforest?… Ans: C
Q3. The text says, “The host tree now must compete with the strangler fig for sunlight and nutrients in the soil. Usually, this process kills the host, and only the fig tree is left.” What conclusion can be drawn about strangler figs based on this evidence?… Ans: A
Q4. Strangler figs do not rely on nutrients directly from the surface they are growing on. What evidence from the text best supports this conclusion?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage?… Ans: B
Q6. Please read the following sentences from the text. As used in these sentences, what does the word immune mean? … Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. Strangler figs destroyed some buildings in ancient Mayan cities __ their roots grew between the bricks in stone walls, eventually destroying the walls.… Ans: B
Q8. How do strangler figs help rainforest animals? Use examples from the text in your answer. … Ans: The spaces between the strangler fig’s twisted roots offer shelter to many kinds of animals: bats, birds, rodents, reptiles, and amphibians. Primates and birds eat figs from the tree and at certain times of the year, strangler figs are the only trees producing fruit in the rainforest.
Q9. How do strangler figs kill other plants? Use examples from the text in your answer.… Ans: The roots of strangler figs wrap around the trunks of their host trees absorbing nutrients that would have entered the roots of the host tree. Strangler figs’ branches and leaves block sunlight from the host tree. Eventually, the host tree often dies because of a lack of nutrients and sunlight.
Q10. Imagine that a scientist discovered a way to get rid of all strangler fig trees in a rainforest. Is this a good idea or not? Support your answer with details from the text… Ans: Student answers may vary and should include evidence from the text. Students may write that it would be a bad idea to remove all strangler fig trees from a rainforest because strangler figs provide shelter and food for animals. In particular, there are certain times of the year when figs are the only food source for some animals. If strangler figs disappeared from the forest, there would be no food for these species. Students may also write that it would be a good idea to remove strangler fig trees because they kill other species of trees in the rainforest by successfully competing for nutrients and sunlight.

Invisible Thieves

Q1. According to the text, what do many spam e-mails try to do? …Ans: A
Q2. What does the author list at the end of the text?… Ans: C
Q3. It’s possible for your identity to be stolen at any age. What evidence from the text supports this conclusion?… Ans: D
Q4. Based on the text, what can you infer?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the text mostly about?… Ans: B
Q6. As used in the sentence, what does the word “transfer” most nearly mean? … Ans: D
Q7. Choose the word or phrase that best completes the sentence.… Ans: D
Q8. Based on the text, what will likely happen if you send a thousand dollars to strangers who say they need it in order to send you a million dollars?… Ans: If you send a thousand dollars to strangers who say they need it to send you a million dollars, you will never get a million dollars – or your money back.
Q9. Why might a person sending an email like this say they can’t transfer money out of the country? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For example, students may answer that the person who wrote the email is probably just making up a situation to confuse them and give them a reason to give away their personal information and money.

Field Trip

Q1. Why does Jeremy miss the field trip with his science class?… Ans: C
Q2. One problem is that Jeremy is upset that he’s missing his field trip. How does his father solve this problem?… Ans: B
Q3. Which of the following statements best supports the conclusion that Jeremy thinks discovery is an exciting part of science?… Ans: D
Q4. At the end of the story Jeremy refers to the exhibits on the field trip as “kiddie” exhibits. What does this suggest he feels?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the story mostly about?… Ans: A
Q6. “Not so fast champ. Finish your sandwich, and then we’ll go. You haven’t eaten anything all day, remember?”
Why might the author have included the above sentence?… Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. Jeremy gets too sick for his field trip and __ learns what it might be like to be a real scientist.… Ans: A
Q8. Jeremy wants to be a scientist when he gets older. Use evidence from the text to support this statement…. Ans: When Professor Helfand suggests his joining his team Jeremy responds, “I can’t wait.” When Professor Helfand mentions all the work it’s going to take to identify all the suns in the universe Jeremy responds, “how exciting.”
Q9. What does Jeremy learn about the stars and universe from Professor Helfand?… Ans: He learns that there are many galaxies and suns in the universe, but many more still left to discover. He learns how scientists can predict the movement of planets and moons. He learns how to identify the big dipper and find the North Star.
Q10. What does Jeremy learn about the subject of science and how it could apply to his future?… Ans: He learns how scientists work in real life. By seeing real scientists making real discoveries, he learns that science could be more than his favorite subject in school. He learns that he too could be a scientist one day and he could make exciting discoveries about the planets and universe.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 5

Below you can find answers for Grade 5 topics:

Peer Pressure Power

Q1. What is peer pressure? Ans: C
Q2. What is the passage trying to persuade readers to do?… Ans: B
Q3. Peer pressure can be a good thing. What evidence from the passage supports this statement?… Ans: D
Q4. Why might someone give in to peer pressure from friends?… Ans: A
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: B
Q6. Read the following sentences: What does the word negative mean above?:… Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. Peer pressure can be a bad thing; _, it can also be a good thing.… Ans: B
Q8. What is an example of negative peer pressure mentioned in the passage?… Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they come from the passage. Examples include the pressure to smoke and being told never to pass the ball to a certain player.
Q9. Name two tips given in the passage for dealing with peer pressure.… Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they come from the passage. Tips include finding real friends who accept the real you and being confident.
Q10. Choose an example of negative peer pressure mentioned in the passage. Then explain how some of the tips listed in the passage could be used to deal with that particular situation.… Ans: Answers may vary. For example, students might respond that young people who find themselves pressured to smoke by a peer could make a confident refusal to do so, with the likely result that the peer will respect their decision. If the peer does not respect the decision, the person being pressured would do well to consider whether or not that peer is a friend and perhaps seek out other, more accepting individuals to spend time with.

Water, Water, Everywhere

Q1. What is hydrology?… Ans: C
Q2. What does the author describe in the passage?… Ans: B
Q3. Read the following sentences. Based on the above evidence, what conclusion can be made? … Ans: B
Q4. The amount of water in rivers and lakes is always changing due to inflows and outflows. Based on the information in this passage and the diagram, what are these inflows and outflows part of?… Ans: B
Q5. What is this passage mainly about?… Ans: D
Q6. Read the following lines from Samuel Coleridge’s poem: The author uses this poem in the passage to illustrate what concept?… Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below..… Ans: B
Q8. Where can we find “sweet water”?… Ans: It exists in many forms on and under the earth’s surface, including glaciers, ice caps, lakes, the atmosphere, rivers, swamps, and marshes.
Q9. The oceans contain what percentage of the water on earth?… Ans: The oceans contain 96.5% of the water on earth.
Q10. The author writes that water is “so important that many people fear if it continues to become scarcer, wars may be fought over water in the future!”… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. Students may explain that there might be a shortage of water in the future since most of the world’s water is contained in oceans, and this water is not currently drinkable. Students may also explain that most of the Earth’s freshwater is frozen in glaciers and ice caps and not accessible to humans.

I Break Stuff For a Living

Q1. What is the first thing that the person telling this story tries to break?… Ans: D
Q2. When does the main character in this story break stuff?… Ans: D
Q3. Breaking something can make it better. What evidence from the story supports this statement? … Ans: C
Q4. Why is doing “Quality Assurance” the perfect job for the main character of this story?… Ans: C
Q5. What is a theme of this story?… Ans: A
Q6. Read the following sentences: Why does the author compare testing a computer program and dragging buckets of sand onto an old bridge? … Ans: A
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. At first the main character gets in trouble for breaking something; __, breaking stuff becomes the main character’s job..… Ans: B
Q8. What does the main character use to break the bridge?… Ans: The main character uses a few bicycles, some rope, and a lot of buckets to break the bridge.
Q9. Why does the main character’s trigonometry teacher keep trying to break his own computer program?… Ans: Exact answers may vary. However, all students should recognize that the teacher keeps trying to break his own computer program in order to make it better.
Q10. Is breaking stuff helpful or harmful? Support your answer with evidence from the story.… Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they are supported by the story. Students may argue that breaking stuff is helpful, citing such examples as the trigonometry teacher breaking his computer program to make it better and the importance of quality assurance testing. Conversely, students may argue that breaking stuff is harmful. They may cite the bridge-breaking incident, inferring from the trouble the main character got into that breaking the bridge was a bad thing.

it’s Opening Day

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Mayflower Myths

Q1. Where did the Pilgrims land when they came to North America?…Ans: D
Q2. What does the author list in this article?… Ans: B
Q3. The Plymouth colonists had strong religious beliefs. What evidence in the text supports this conclusion? … Ans: A
Q4. Based on the article as a whole, what is a myth?… Ans: B
Q5. Which sentence from the text best states the article’s main idea?… Ans: B
Q6. Why might the author have chosen to use headings that start with “Myth:” throughout the entire article? … Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes this sentence.… Ans: A
Q8. What did the pilgrims think of as a “thanksgiving?”… Ans: To pilgrims, a thanksgiving was a religious holiday for which they would go to church and thank God for a specific event.
Q9. Why would the Pilgrims never have thought of their own harvest feast as a thanksgiving?… Ans: The Pilgrims wouldn’t have thought of their own harvest feast as a thanksgiving because it was a non-religious celebration. They danced, sang secular songs, and played games at their feast, which wouldn’t have been allowed on an actual thanksgiving day.
Q10. Would Pilgrims have considered today’s Thanksgiving to be a true “thanksgiving” in their eyes? Why or why not? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.… Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they are supported by the text. For example, students may argue that Pilgrims would not have considered today’s Thanksgiving to be a true “thanksgiving” because, much like the original harvest feast, it does not focus on prayer and religion.

The American Civil War

Q1. What was the major issue between the North and the South starting in the 1850s?…Ans: C
Q2. The passage explains the sequence of events that led to the Civil War. What happened after seven Southern states seceded from the Union?… Ans: A
Q3. Slave labor was important for the economy of the Southern states. What evidence from the passage best supports this statement?… Ans: D
Q4. The passage states, “Enslaved people were considered property.” Based on this information, what conclusion can you make about how enslaved people were treated? … Ans: B
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: A
Q6. Read the following sentences: What does the author mean by calling plantations the “backbone” of the Southern economy? … Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. In the Southern states, slavery was supported because it fueled the economy. __, the Northern states viewed slavery as morally wrong. … Ans: C
Q8. What was abolitionism?… Ans: Abolitionism was a movement that called for the legal end to slavery in all of the United States.
Q9. Explain why the Southern states saw abolitionism as a threat to their way of life.… Ans: The Southern states saw abolitionism as a threat to their way of life because abolitionism called for the legal end to slavery in the United States. The South relied on enslaved people to work on its plantations and keep its economy strong.
Q10. Explain how the issue of slavery and the abolitionism movement helped to start the American Civil War. Support your answer using information from the passage. … Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. Students should indicate that slavery was a contentious issue between the North and the South: the North was morally opposed to slavery by the 1850s and did not want to allow pro-slavery states to join the Union, while the South relied on slavery for their economic power. When the abolitionism movement began in the North, the South saw it as a threat to their way of life, and politically fought against the North on this issue. After pro-Union Abraham Lincoln was elected president, seven Southern states seceded from the Union so that they could govern themselves as they saw fit (particularly on the issue of slavery). The ensuing tension between the Union and Confederacy led to a physical clash between the two sides, culminating in the start of the Civil War.

Magnetic Fields And The Magnetic Compass

Q1. What is a magnetic field?… Ans: C
Q2. What does the author describe?… Ans: A
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. Magnets are objects that produce an area of magnetic force called a magnetic field. Magnetic fields by themselves are invisible to the human eye. Magnets attract or pull, objects made of materials that are very attracted to magnets. These materials include iron and nickel. A magnet also reacts to another magnet when they are close enough to each other…. Ans: B
Q4. Read these sentences from the text. Based on these sentences, what does a magnetic compass show someone? … Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of the text?… Ans: B
Q6. Read these sentences from the text. As used in the text, what does the phrase “general direction” mean? As used in the text, what does the phrase “general direction” mean? … Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below.… Ans: B
Q8. What is one end of a magnetized compass’s needle attracted to?… Ans: One end of the needle is attracted to the earth’s magnetic north pole.
Q9. Based on the text, what other direction or directions can someone figure out if the person knows the direction of north?.… Ans: The person can figure out south, east, and west.
Q10. A person is lost and needs to go south. How might a magnetic compass help the person? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Students should explain that the earth is like a huge magnet. The needle of a magnetic compass is magnetized, and one end of the needle is attracted to the earth’s magnetic north pole. This means that the needle shows the direction of north. After the person knows which way is north, the person can figure out the other directions, like the direction of south.

Brothers

Q1. What has caused Philip’s mother to worry at the beginning of the text?… Ans: C
Q2. What main problem does Joseph face in this story?… Ans: B
Q3. Joseph thinks his family’s town is holding him back from achieving his dreams and goals. What evidence from the text best supports this conclusion? … Ans: B
Q4. Based on the information in the text, how does Philip feel about his brother Joseph?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of the text?… Ans: B
Q6. Why might the author have included the part of the story about the day Philip broke his arm and the conversation the two brothers had?… Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence. Philip asks his brother if he will say goodbye before he leaves town; _, Joseph simply laughs and does not answer the question.… Ans: A
Q8. When Joseph tells Philip he plans to leave town someday, what does Philip ask?… Ans: Philip asks if Joseph will say goodbye before he leaves.
Q9. How does Joseph help his brother Philip? Give at least one example from the text to support your answer… Ans: Joseph helps Philip by comforting him and reassuring him. For example, when Philip hears his father say that he is bad at baseball, Joseph reassures Philip by squeezing his shoulder and telling him not to worry. After Philip breaks his arm, Joseph takes him out for ice cream and tells him there is more to life than baseball.
Q10. Is Joseph a good older brother to Philip? Support your argument with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the text. Students may argue that Joseph is a good brother because he is there for Philip when he overhears his dad say that he is bad at baseball and he comforts him when he breaks his arm. On the other hand, students may argue that Joseph is not a good brother or could be a better brother, because he runs away from home without saying goodbye to Philip—even though Philip asked him to say goodbye last year.

Elizabeth Blackwell

Q1. What was a job that no woman in America had in the early 1800s?…Ans: C
Q2. The author contrasts the Blackwell family with other families. How was the Blackwell family different?… Ans: B
Q3. Elizabeth Blackwell showed determination when trying to become a doctor. What evidence in the text supports this claim?… Ans: D
Q4. Read these sentences from the text: Based on this evidence, why might many students, teachers, and townspeople have opposed Elizabeth?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: C
Q6. Read these sentences from the text: Based on these sentences, what does the word “rigorous” mean?… Ans: A
Q7. Read these sentences from the text: How could the second sentence best be rewritten?… Ans: A
Q8. How did many students and teachers at Elizabeth’s medical school feel about her being there in the beginning?… Ans: Answers may vary but should resemble the following. Many students and teachers at Elizabeth’s medical school were opposed to her being there in the beginning.
Q9. How did most people at Elizabeth’s medical school feel toward her by the time she graduated?… Ans: Answers may vary but should resemble the following. Most people at Elizabeth’s medical school were supportive of her by the time she graduated. The dean even bowed to Elizabeth when presenting her diploma. He (and others at the school) probably felt respect for her.
Q10. Why might people’s feelings about Elizabeth becoming a doctor have changed?
Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For instance: People’s feelings about Elizabeth becoming a doctor might have changed because people recognized her intelligence and ability. Many people had discouraged Elizabeth from going to medical school. They thought and told her that women could not handle the rigors of medical school and being a doctor. The fact that Elizabeth graduated first in her class proved them wrong. As Elizabeth’s performance in medical school probably showed the people around her, she could handle the rigor. People probably began supporting her instead of opposing her once they recognized her abilities.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 6

Below you can find answers for Grade 6 topics:

Plate Tectonics

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Dig This

Q1. What do paleontologists study?… Ans: A
Q2. How does the author describe Earth?… Ans: D
Q3. Which of the following conclusions about rocks is supported by the passage?… Ans: D
Q4. Read this sentence from the passage: Based on the text, the word uniform means… Ans: B
Q5. Which statement best describes the central idea of this passage?… Ans: C
Q6. What are the three main types of rock on Earth?… Ans: The three main types of rock on Earth are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. [paragraphs under “Rock On!”]
Q7. How do you think the scientists who found the Archaeopteryx fossil felt? Give an example from the article that supports your answer… Ans: The scientists were probably excited because the fossil shows that the bird had feet similar to those of the dinosaurs. “This fossil gives scientists more evidence that dinosaurs were the ancient ancestors of modern birds.” [paragraph 1]
Q8. The question below is an incomplete sentence. Choose the word that best completes the sentence. Scientists have discovered fossils of ancient flowers, dinosaurs, __ other creatures. … Ans: A

Spring

Q1. According to the first stanza of the poem, the tree did all of the following EXCEPT…Ans: A
Q2. Read this stanza from the poem: Which of the following describes the relationship between these lines? … Ans: A
Q3. To what does the author compare the frozen earth?… Ans: A
Q4. Read these lines from the poem: Based on the text, the word compromise means … Ans: B
Q5. The primary purpose of this poem is to describe.… Ans: B
Q6. What phase of the moon is described in the poem? … Ans: It is a half moon. [stanza 2]
Q7. What, do you think, is the “dark blue blanket” that covers the moon? How do you know?… Ans: The dark blue blanket is the nighttime sky. Not only can you infer that the moon comes out at night, but the poet also writes that the moon is waiting “for the morning,” so it must be nighttime. [stanza 2]
Q8. The question below is an incomplete sentence. Choose the word that best completes the sentence.A small tree bends with the wind, __ it does not break. … Ans: C

 

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The Tree House

Q1. What does Billy do every time he visits his grandfather?… Ans: C
Q2. Where does the beginning of the story take place? … Ans: C
Q3. In the passage, the tree house’s rotting pieces of wood, spider webs, and a fading rug are described. Based on this evidence, what conclusion can be made?… Ans: A
Q4. Billy feels relieved when he enters the tree house and sees a boring, empty room. What conclusion can be made from this?… Ans: B
Q5. What is this story mostly about?… Ans: C
Q6. Read the following sentence: As used in the passage, what word could best replace foliage? … Ans: A
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. Billy followed a chipmunk into a meadow _ meeting a bearded gnome.… Ans: D
Q8. How does Billy return home from the majestic meadow?… Ans: Billy meets a gnome named Gruff, who tells him that they don’t have much time. He quickly hands Billy some flowers and stems, and with the other gnomes, they make a crown. Gruff places the crown on Billy’s head. When Billy goes to give Gruff a hug, the gnomes knock him over into a pile of leaves and he is sucked back up into the forest, next to the tree with the treehouse that he had climbed. There is no longer a tree or a treehouse, and Billy walks home.
Q9. What evidence supports the conclusion that Gramps knows about the tree house and magical underground world of the gnomes? … Ans: When Billy returns home, Gramps isn’t confused about the crown, or about where Billy was. He simply smiles. When he tells Billy not to climb trees in the rain, even though Billy is dry, he is indicating that he knows that Billy had found the magical treehouse and was underground during the time that it rained.
Q10. Gruff tells Billy that the crown should “be a reminder that the world is full of surprises.” How does the story illustrate the message that the world is full of surprises? Use information from the story to support your answer. … Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the story. For example, students may explain that Billy ends up having a magical and unexpected adventure after climbing a magical tree house that led to an underground world of gnomes.

Out Of Line Online

Q1. According to the text, what is more, long-lasting than words that are spoken in person?… Ans: B
Q2. What is the problem text describes? … Ans: B
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. What can you conclude based on this evidence? … Ans: A
Q4. Based on the text, what would Brian O’Connor, the spokesperson for the Family Violence Prevention Fund, most likely do?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of the text?… Ans: D
Q6. Read these sentences from the text. As used in these sentences, what does the word “exposed” mean?… Ans: B
Q7. Choose the word or phrase that best completes the sentence.… Ans: D
Q8. What is one solution listed in the text to help prevent you from posting something unkind or inappropriate online?… Ans: Answers may vary but should be a solution described in the text. For example, one solution is to sleep on it and see if you feel differently in the morning.
Q9. Based on the text, why should people think before they type online? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.… Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For example, students may answer that people should think before they type because what they say may hurt others like the examples given by Rachel K. The things people type online may also come back to haunt them later and affect future opportunities like with college or job applications.

Group Behavior

Q1. What is “group behavior”?…Ans: B
Q2. Being part of a group is an effect. What caused people to become part of a group a long time ago?… Ans: B
Q3. Groups accept certain behaviors according to what their members believe to be correct. Which sentence from the passage best supports this conclusion?… Ans: C
Q4. Based on the passage, what might the identity of a group be based on?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the passage mostly about?… Ans: D
Q6. Based on the passage, what does the word “prosper” most nearly mean?… Ans: D
Q7. Values are a summary of what the group’s goals might be or a general idea of what is acceptable behavior; __, some groups might strongly believe in honesty and dislike theft.… Ans: D
Q8. Describe at least two advantages of being in a group by using information from the passage… Ans:• Humans in groups from long ago were able to find more food.• Humans in groups from long ago were able to more effectively battle animals that threatened them. • People in groups feel safer.• People in groups enjoy a sense of companionship.
Q9. Group behavior also makes it more likely that all of the members of a group will believe something just because one member says so. Explain why this may be a negative aspect of group behavior by using information from the passage.… Ans: The thing which the one member believes, and as a result, the entire group believes, maybe not be true or favorable. Thus, the group’s behavior may be guided by a faulty belief which could have dangerous results.
Q10. Explain whether a group fighting a “common enemy” is a positive or negative thing. Use information from the passage to support your argument… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. Students may explain that a group fighting a “common enemy” is a negative thing because the members of the group may need to engage in dangerous behavior to protect the group against an enemy that has different norms or values. Students may also note that this is a negative thing because groups may be more inclined to attack other groups that do not have the same norms or values, which may or may not be right.
Conversely, students may argue that a group fighting a “common enemy” is a positive thing because the members of a group are united behind one goal or cause and show their dedication to the group’s norms or values. This may end up strengthening the group.

Space Junk

Q1. What has left tons of “space junk” in orbit around the earth?… Ans: B
Q2. Countries around the world have agreed to limit the time their space tools stay in orbit to 25 years. As explained in the passage, what problem does this solution address?… Ans: A
Q3. Trash has become a problem in outer space too. What evidence from the text best supports this statement? … Ans: D
Q4. Why have countries agreed to build space tools that must fall safely into the earth’s atmosphere?… Ans: B
Q5. What was the passage mostly about?… Ans: C
Q6. Read the following sentences: What does the word urgent most nearly mean?… Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. Years of space exploration have left tons of “space junk,” _ many scientists are trying to find a way to clean up outer space..… Ans: A
Q8. What did the 2009 collision of a United States satellite and a Russian satellite cause?… Ans: This collision caused the satellites to break into more than 2,000 pieces.
Q9. What have the Germans done to help clean up space junk?… Ans: The Germans have been planning a space mission with robots that would collect pieces of space trash and bring them back to Earth so that they can be safely destroyed.
Q10. Different countries have explored or are exploring different methods to clean up space junk. Explain why some methods may be more effective than others. Use evidence from the text to support your answer. Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the text. For example, students may explain that in 2007, the Chinese tried to blow up one of its satellites with a missile. Unfortunately, the explosion only created thousands of pieces of smaller space junk. Students may reason that this method is probably less effective than the space mission the Germans are planning. The space mission with robots would collect pieces of space trash and bring them back to Earth so that they can be safely destroyed. This seems like a more promising method than that of the Chinese as it does not seem to cause the creation of more space junk.

The Elements Of Jewelry

Q1. According to the passage, what two things do jewelers have to consider when making jewelry?… Ans: C
Q2. How does the author compare gold and silver?… Ans: A
Q3. Pure gold is too soft to be worn as jewelry. What evidence from the passage best supports this conclusion?… Ans: D
Q4. Based on the information in the passage, what is the most likely reason why platinum is more valuable than gold?… Ans: B
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: C
Q6. Read the following sentences: As used in this sentence, what does the word “endure” most nearly mean?… Ans: A
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below.
_ gold is softer than silver and needs to be blended with other metals for use in jewelry, gold is more valuable than silver.… Ans: D
Q8. How can a jeweler determine what type of metal something is?… Ans: A jeweler can determine what type of metal something is by finding the minimum temperature needed to melt the metal, as metals are chemical elements with predictable melting points.
Q9. What is an alloy? Why do jewelers use alloys in jewelry?… Ans: An alloy is a blend of two or more different metals. Jewelers create alloys with metals such as gold, which is too soft to be used on its own. So, it is blended with other metals to hold up to the daily wear-and-tear experienced by jewelry.
Q10. Explain why jewelers need to understand the properties of different materials in order to make jewelry. What might happen if a jeweler did not have this knowledge? Support your answer using information from the passage. Explain why jewelers need to understand the properties of different materials in order to make jewelry. What might happen if a jeweler did not have this knowledge? Support your answer using information from the passage….Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. Students should indicate that jewelers need to understand the properties of the different materials they use in order to make jewelry because without this understanding they would not be able to create jewelry that is suited to the circumstances in which it will be worn. Jewelers would also not be able to create jewelry without an understanding of the properties of different materials. For example, without understanding the different properties of gold or silver, a jeweler would not know the metal’s melting point and would have problems melting or shaping the metal.

Louis Braille

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Apples The Health Benefits

Q1. According to the text, what is a reason that apples are an important part of a healthy diet?… Ans: B
Q2. What is a way that the author asks the reader to analyze the list of apple types?… Ans: C
Q3. Apples can provide several different beneficial vitamins and minerals to the body when you eat them.
What evidence from the text supports this conclusion?… Ans: D
Q4. If given the choice between eating a whole apple and drinking a glass of apple juice, which would be healthier?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: D
Q6. Read this sentence from the text. In the sentence, what does the word “function” mean?… Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. Apples are an important part of your daily diet, they should not be the only food you eat!
_
gold is softer than silver and needs to be blended with other metals for use in jewelry, gold is more valuable than silver.… Ans: D
Q8. Explain why there is truth to the saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” Use evidence from the text to support your answer…. Ans: Scientists have found that apples lower the risk of certain diseases, and they have phytochemicals that keep you healthy, so you might not have to visit the doctor as often.
Q9. Why would the author include recipes in the text? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.… Ans: The author might have included the recipes because studies have shown different benefits to eating apples, such as lowering the risk of cancer, stroke, and heart disease. It is recommended to eat at least one apple a day, so the recipes can help to make it easier to eat one or more per day.

The Power Of The Wind

Q1. Where does Kyle’s mom work?… Ans: Kyle’s mom works at a wind turbine farm.
Q2. How does Kyle’s mom feel about her work?… Ans: She is very passionate about it.
Q3. Read the following sentences. Based on this information, how does Kyle most likely feel about his new life in northern California? … Ans: Kyle is enjoying his new life in northern California.
Q4. Based on the text, why is Kyle’s mom interested in wind turbines?… Ans: She wants to improve energy efficiency and decrease pollution in the environment.
Q5. What is this story mostly about?… Ans: The story is mostly about the work Kyle’s mom does on a wind turbine farm and Kyle’s new life in northern California.
Q6. Read the sentences and answer the question. What does the word “generate” most nearly mean as used in the text? … Ans: produce
Q7. What word or phrase best completes the sentence? Kyle’s mom was offered a job at the wind turbine farm. __, his family moved to northern California … Ans: Therefore (Please note that there may be more than one acceptable response.)
Q8. Why is Kyle joining his mom on the tour she is giving of a wind turbine farm?… Ans:
Q9. Why did Kyle know plenty about the work his mom did to design more efficient wind turbine blades?… Ans:
Q10. Explain how Kyle’s mom’s career has impacted him. Support your answer using evidence from the text… Ans:

War Stories

Q1. For the Eyewitness to History Contest, readers were asked to interview people who have witnessed historic events. What was the common theme of the three winning interviews in this text?… Ans: B
Q2. What does Julie Sarne’s Oma describe in the first interview?… Ans: A
Q3. Claire Curtis’s grandfather was not afraid on the nights his family had to sleep in the basement during the air attacks on England. What evidence in the text supports this statement?… Ans: A
Q4. Based on the information in the text, how might Hedy Gaetano’s experience as a child living in Germany during the war best be described?… Ans: A
Q5. What is this text mostly about?… Ans: A
Q6. Read these sentences from the text. What does the phrase “to be free of” mean here? … Ans: A
Q7. Read this sentence from the text. What word could replace the word “even” without changing the meaning of the sentence? … Ans: C
Q8. Who were the three people interviewed in the text?… Ans: Answers may vary slightly, but students should name all three people in some way. The people interviewed were Julie Sarne’s Oma (grandmother), Claire Curtis’s grandfather, and Hedy Gaetano (Jamie Lytle’s grandmother).
Q9. In the first interview, Julie Sarne’s Oma discusses what life was like in Germany for Jewish people. In the third interview, Hedy Gaetano discusses what life was like in Germany for people who weren’t Jewish.
Draw one contrast between their two experiences.… Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. One prominent contrast between their experiences is that while Hedy Gaetano remained in Germany during the war, Julie Sarne’s Oma left Germany for China.
Q10. All three interviews in the text are about life as a child during World War II. Why might the author have chosen to share all three interviews instead of focusing on only one?… Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. The author may have chosen to include all three interviews in order to provide three different views of the same war. The first interview shows what it was like for a Jewish girl living in Germany, the second interview shows what it was like to be living in London for the Blitz, and the third interview describes how even life in Germany for people who weren’t Jewish was not easy during the war. By sharing all three interviews, the author illustrates how the war affected people on both sides and in more than one place.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 7

Below you Can Find Answers For Grade 7 Topics:

The Eco Pyramid

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Fanhood

Q1. With whom does Sam go to baseball games?… Ans: D
Q2. How does Jessica’s attitude toward baseball change in the story?… Ans: D
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. Based on this evidence, why might Sam not have wanted to talk during the game?… Ans: A
Q4. Read these sentences from the text. What can you infer about Sam’s feelings toward Jessica from these sentences?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this story?… Ans: B
Q6. Read these sentences from the text. Why might the author have italicized the word “knew” in the first sentence? … Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence. Sam liked talking with Jessica during the baseball game. _, he did not like missing out on a lot of the game.… Ans: A
Q8. Sam enjoys watching baseball with Jessica more than he enjoyed watching it with Jordan. Support this conclusion with evidence from the text … Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they are supported by the text. For example, students may note that going to a baseball game with Jordan “had been a disaster.” Jordan had wanted to talk the whole time, while Sam had not. Plus, Sam felt embarrassed about taking notes and jotting down stats when he was with Jordan. In contrast, he “liked talking to Jessica” during the game and imagines hugging her at a future game.
Q9. What is Sam’s conflict at the end of the story? Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary, but students should recognize that Sam is torn between his interest in Jessica and his interest in baseball. The author describes this conflict plainly: “Sam felt conflicted: he had really liked watching the game with Jessica, but he had barely paid attention to the action itself. He didn’t regret talking with Jessica, but he definitely regretted missing the game.”
Q10. How might Sam’s conflict be resolved? Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they are supported by the text. For example, students may respond that Sam’s conflict could be resolved if Jessica comes to share his level of interest in baseball. That way, she would want to watch baseball games just as intently as Sam, so if they do indeed attend more games together, he would not have to divide his attention between her and the events of the game.

The Gift Of The Magi

Q1. What country was founded when the United States American Colonization Society purchased land in West Africa?… Ans: C
Q2. Although Liberian quilts are similar in some ways to American traditional quilts, there are differences between the two. What is one example of a difference between American and Liberian quilts that the author lists?… Ans: A
Q3. Quilts are an important part of the relationship between the United States and Liberia.
What information from the text supports this idea?… Ans: D
Q4. Read the following sentences from the text. What can you infer about Liberian quilts based on this information? … Ans: C
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: B

Running A Real Zombie 5k

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First Ladies

Q1. According to the text, which three countries have elected women to lead them?…Ans: C
Q2. Read these sentences from the text. Which of the following describes the relationship of these sentences?… Ans: D
Q3. Read these sentences from the text. What conclusion can you draw based on this information?… Ans: C
Q4. Based on the text, what might have best prepared the three women to lead their countries? … Ans: C
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: B
Q6. Read this sentence from the text. As used in the text, what does the word “lingering” mean? … Ans: A
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence. The bloody civil war in Liberia ended in 2003, __ scars still mark the African nation..… Ans: A
Q8. According to the text, in which country do only a small percentage of people control most of the wealth?… Ans: Chile is a wealthy nation. In Chile, the richest 20 percent of the population controls 61 percent of the country’s wealth, according to the World Bank.
Q9. What might help each of the leaders solve her country’s economic problems? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Each leader has experience working in government positions. After democracy was restored in Chile in 1990, Michelle Bachelet entered public service. She served as Minister of Health and as Defense Minister. She was praised for helping to heal lingering distrust between Chilean citizens and the military.

Relative Problems

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Abraham

Q1. Who is Abraham?…Ans: B
Q2. How does Abraham change in the story?… Ans: D
Q3. Abraham’s life in captivity was very different from that of his wild peers, as he learns when he meets the wild elephant male. What evidence supports this?… Ans: C
Q4. Based on the story, how did Abraham adjust to life in the wild?… Ans: D
Q5. What is this passage mainly about?… Ans: B
Q6. Read the following paragraph, written from Abraham’s point of view. Based on the description above, what kind of “stick” was the man really holding? … Ans: D
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentences below..… Ans: B
Q8. The wild elephant herd eventually came to accept Abraham as one of their own. What evidence from the text supports this conclusion?… Ans: Abraham retained the graceful movements of a practiced dancer, and the female elephants liked this. During confrontations with humans or other herds, the different groups of males all competed to recruit Abraham to their team. And Abraham was able to find food in places none of the other elephants had ever thought to look. Soon Abraham had a mate and baby elephants of his own. All of this suggests that Abraham was able to become a successful member of the group, even if he never became a “lead alpha male.”
Q9. Describe how Abraham’s experience as a circus elephant helped him to survive in the wild…. Ans: Answers may vary, but students should note that it gave him a strong and graceful body to swim to safety, fight off attacks and attract females, and it gave him a knowledge of humans that came in handy when finding food.
Q10. How do you think Abraham feels about his new life with the wild elephants at the end of the story? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Answers may vary, but students are likely to conclude that Abraham feels happy and content. He has a family, he is accepted, and at the end of the story, we are led to believe that he may not even remember his former life as a circus animal. When the story ends with the line “Abraham turned his back to the barge and ate,” it seems to symbolize the idea that Abraham has turned his back on his former life, and has become part of the wild environment in which he now lives.

Study Buddies

Q1. According to the text, what do health officials encourage?… Ans: B
Q2. What does the author list in the section titled “Testing, Testing, 1, 2. 3”?… Ans: C
Q3. A clinical trial or study may not always help the participants, but it may help people in the future.
What evidence from the text supports this conclusion?… Ans: A
Q4. Based on the text, what can you conclude about children’s and teens’ involvement in medical trials?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of the text?… Ans: D
Q6. As used in the sentence, what does the word “assent” mean?… Ans: A
Q7. Some teens choose not to participate in a trial _ they’re already exhausted from treatment after treatment and don’t want to go through more..… Ans: B
Q8. Based on the text, what are some of the things a teen might consider in determining whether to participate in a medical trial or not?… Ans: A teen might consider potential side effects and health risks.
Q9. What does Unguru mean when he says that children participating in the trials take “a huge leap of faith”? Use evidence from the text to support your answer…. Ans: Because signing up for a trial doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll get the new treatment; you could be placed in a control group. Also, the new treatment isn’t guaranteed to work.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 8

Below you can find answers for Grade 8 topics:

The Hoover Dam

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Homemade

Q1. Who is the main character of this story?… Ans: D
Q2. How does the author describe Matt?… Ans: C
Q3. Based on the evidence above, how can we conclude Matt feels about his life as a stay-at-home dad ?… Ans: A
Q4. Why does the author think Matt gets a lot of practice in multi-tasking?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of the text?… Ans: D
Q6. As used in the passage, what does the word “inhale” mean?… Ans: C
Q7. When Elsie was born, Matt became a stay-at-home-dad. __, Matt spent several years as a full-time photographer..… Ans: B
Q8. The author has a positive opinion of Matt. What evidence from the text supports this conclusion?… Ans: Answers may vary, but students may note how many positive words he uses to describe Matt: “confident,” “skilled,” etc.
Q9. Describe how Matt cares for Elsie during the author’s visit… Ans: Answers may vary, but students will note that he is very attentive to her needs. He feeds her while feeding himself (and made her food himself). He talks with her and about her all evening. They dance with her at night, and he fills up her tub while showing the guests out the door.
Q10. Explain whether being a stay-at-home parent is a difficult job for Matt. Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary. Students may point to the “ease” with which he balances his guests and his duties to Elsie. The author describes his life in positive terms. However, they may also note that he feels like he is on a “stopwatch” and can’t fully pay attention to his guests. The author’s own reaction to Matt’s current status (“get this”) also shows that this lifestyle is one the author considers unusual for a man. Students may want to discuss their own reactions to this descriptive passage and its implications.

See If I Care

Q1. What was the narrator’s former job in Albany?… Ans: C
Q2. What situation has the narrator struggled through?… Ans: A
Q3. The narrator believed that an article about the scandalous photos of the mayor would improve her career. What evidence from the story best supports this conclusion?… Ans: B
Q4. Based on the repeated phrase, “see if I care,” what conclusion can you make about the narrator?… Ans: D
Q5. What is this story mostly about?… Ans: C
Q6. As used in this sentence, what does the phrase “lavished upon” most nearly mean?… Ans: A
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below. The narrator believes that Maxwell was part of the scandal that made her lose her job; __, she has not been able to prove Maxwell’s guilt..… Ans: B
Q8. Who does the narrator blame for the loss of her job as editor-in-chief?… Ans: The narrator blames Grady Maxwell for the loss of her job.
Q9. How does the narrator’s view of Maxwell change over time?… Ans: At first, the narrator “hardly noticed Maxwell,” but over time, she began to view him as her story’s “villain” and perhaps even as the “principal architect” of the scandal that cost her her job.
Q10. “[Grady Maxwell] has grown in my mind over the years, and so too has his importance to my story.”.. Ans: Based on this information, the narrator has spent her time over the years thinking about Maxwell and how the narrator thinks Maxwell cost her her job. It does not seem like the narrator has let go of her bitterness. She talks about how she was “never able to prove” that Maxwell was in on the scandal, which indicates that she spent time stewing about the loss of her job. She ends the passage by repeating, “See if I care,” which indicates that she really does care about losing her job.

Wetlands And Habitat Loss

Q1. What is a wetland?… Ans: D
Q2. destruction of wetlands is an effect. What is one of its causes?… Ans: B
Q3. Wetlands serve important purposes for humans. What information from the passage supports this statement?… Ans: B
Q4. How have attitudes about wetlands changed in recent decades?… Ans: C
Q5. What is this passage mainly about?… Ans: D
Q6. What does the word swamp mean in the sentence above?… Ans: A
Q7. For years people wanted to avoid or destroy wetlands; __, many people want to save wetlands.… Ans: B
Q8. What is happening to Louisiana’s wetlands?… Ans: Louisiana’s wetlands are disappearing.
Q9. If Louisiana’s wetlands were destroyed, what would happen? Support your answer with evidence from the passage… Ans: Students may respond that many species of migratory birds dependent on the wetlands would go extinct. They may respond that the Louisiana economy, heavily reliant on wetlands, would take a hit. Any answer supported by the passage is acceptable.
Q10. Should wetlands be protected? Explain why or why not, using evidence from the passage… Ans: Answers may vary, as long as they are supported by the passage. Students favoring wetlands protection may point out that wetlands supply many people with jobs and are vital to a variety of wildlife. Students against wetlands protection may argue that building homes for people or buildings for businesses is more important than letting land that no one is using just sit there.

Machines Get Smarter

Q1. What does AI stand for?… Ans: D
Q2. How does the author describe “machine intelligence”?… Ans: B
Q3. What can you conclude about machine learning based on this information?… Ans: A
Q4. How do you think the author would describe the future of AI?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage?… Ans: B
Q6. As used in the sentence, what does the word “analyze” most closely mean?… Ans: A
Q7. Scientists used AI to analyze coronavirus research trends, _ the algorithms used were not built for that specific purpose.… Ans: C
Q8. Describe the process of machine learning. Use details from the text to support your description… Ans: Machine learning programs can “teach” themselves—learning from their mistakes, changing the way they process data to improve their performance. The programs can then act without any further input from human beings, making decisions based on data.
Q9. Which involves more human input, basic algorithms, or machine learning? Support your answer with evidence from the text… Ans: Basic algorithms rely more on human input. They can digest and sort huge amounts of data, but need human input to do so. Machine learning programs do not rely on human input because they can “teach” themselves by learning from their mistakes, so they can act without human input by basing their decision on data.
Q10. Imagine you were building a robot that could perform surgery on its own. Would you rather have it rely on a basic algorithm with a human supervisor, or on a program that uses machine learning? Support your argument with details from the text… Ans: Answers may vary but should include evidence from the text. If students argue that their robot should rely on a basic algorithm, they might talk about the fact that there’s no threat of basic algorithms getting “smarter” than humans. If they argue for machine learning, they might talk about how machine learning programs correct their own mistakes and can make decisions based on data.

Hair Wars

Q1. What did DeAndre Arnold’s school threaten to do if he didn’t cut his hair?… Ans: B
Q2. What was the effect of Arnold’s school threatening to punish him if he did not cut his dreadlocks?… Ans: C
Q3. Discrimination against African American students’ hairstyles has happened across the nation, not just at Barbers Hill High School in Texas. What evidence from the passage supports this idea?… Ans: A
Q4. Lawmakers have begun responding recently to discrimination based on hairstyles. What evidence from the passage supports this idea?… Ans: C
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage?… Ans: B
Q6. As used in this sentence, what does the word “controversies” most closely mean?… Ans: C
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the statement below.DeAndre Arnold faced discrimination for his hairstyle at school, but _, he got to celebrate African American hairstyles by walking the red carpet for the movie Hair Love. … Ans: B
Q8. Describe one example from the text of a student who was discriminated against based on their hairstyle…. Ans: for his hairstyle; Mya and Deanna Cook, who were banned from their school’s prom for their hairstyles; and Alan Maloney, who was discriminated against at a wrestling match for his hairstyle.
Q9. What is one way that students who have been discriminated against are “standing up for their rights”? … Ans: Answers could include: students have filed legal complaints against their schools by partnering with legal organizations, or students have withdrawn from their schools out of protest.
Q10. Why is it so important for lawmakers to act against discrimination based on hairstyles? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Answers should feature evidence from the text, and could include the fact that students are being negatively impacted by discrimination based on hairstyles, or the fact that individual school policies are harming students so laws must be passed to protect them.

The Age Of Exploration

Q1. According to the passage, what was historically one of the most efficient ways to navigate the world?… Ans: B
Q2. The passage lists different navigational instruments available to explorers. Which of the following navigational instruments was not available to Christopher Columbus?… Ans: A
Q3. Limited knowledge of world geography was a problem for early exploration. What evidence from the passage supports this conclusion?… Ans: C
Q4. How did navigational tools change from the 15th century to the 17th century?… Ans: D
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: B
Q6. As used in this sentence, what does “inadvertently” mean?… Ans: C
Q7. Early navigational techniques such as “dead reckoning” were imprecise; __, exploring uncharted seas was challenging and inconsistent.… Ans: A
Q8. Why was exploration a major goal for governments?… Ans: Exploration was a major goal for governments because it offered the prospect of new commercial operations and trade routes.
Q9. Why did some governments and kings have difficulty agreeing to fund explorations?… Ans: Students should list the following reasons:
inaccuracies of navigational tools made exploration by sea inconsistent and unpredictable, explorers had limited knowledge of the world’s geography, and the financial risks were too high as navigators could become irretrievably lost
Q10. The text states that “as time went on, more European countries began to explore the world.” Use information from the text to explain why more European countries began to explore the world as time went on… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the text. For example, students may reason that explorers’ knowledge about the world’s geography increased as navigational tools became more accurate. Thus, explorers became better equipped to explore unknown territories which may have also mitigated the financial risks associated with these explorations. As a result, governments had greater confidence in these explorations and what they could accomplish, enabling them to explore more of the world.

Education In America

Q1. What two elements of education have evolved since colonial times?… Ans: Curricula and teaching methods have evolved since colonial times.
Q2. The text describes the causes of certain developments in American education. What does the text suggest is the cause behind the continued expansion of education in the early twentieth century?… Ans: The country needed more highly educated people because managerial and leadership roles in business and industry needed to be filled.
Q3. Education in America reflects the values and aspirations of the country. What evidence supports this conclusion?… Ans: Girls started to receive greater educational access in the nineteenth century because the idea of “republican motherhood” became more popular.
Q4. Based on the text, what two groups of people have faced inequality in education?… Ans: Female students and minority students have faced inequality in education.
Q5. What is the main idea of the article?… Ans: The evolution of curricula and teaching methods in American education provides insight into the values and aspirations of the country.
Q6. Read the sentences and answer the question. As used in the text, what does the word “affluent” mean? … Ans: wealthy
Q7. What word or phrase best completes the sentence?. Black students were forced to attend separate schools from white students __ the Supreme Court’s 1954 decision. … Ans: until (Please note that there may be more than one acceptable response.)
Q8. According to the text, what is the success or failure of education closely tied to?… Ans:
Q9. Identify one argument about educational inequality that the author makes. Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans:
Q10. Describe at least one factor which has impacted the evolution of American education. Make sure to analyze how this factor has impacted the evolution of American education… Ans:

The Great Barrier Reef

Q1. What is the Great Barrier Reef?… Ans: C
Q2. The danger that the Great Barrier Reef now faces is an effect. What is one cause of the danger it faces?… Ans: C
Q3. Many animals live in and around the Great Barrier Reef. What evidence from the passage supports this statement?… Ans: B
Q4. Based on information in the passage, what is a symbiotic and mutualistic relationship?… Ans: D
Q5. What is this passage mainly about?… Ans: C
Q6. Read the following sentence: What does the word diversity mean?… Ans: A
Q7. The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef on Earth; __, it may disappear within your lifetime. … Ans: D
Q8. What is an ecosystem?… Ans: An ecosystem is a complex system containing several species that interact with one another.
Q9. What are some of the animals that live in the ecosystems of the Great Barrier Reef?… Ans: Students should name at least two animal species mentioned in the passage. These include coral, clownfish, sea anemones, dolphins, mollusks, and more.
Q10. The passage states that “rising ocean temperatures also affect the ecosystems in the coral reef, throwing off the delicate balance that allows so many species to coexist.” Explain how rising ocean temperatures, pollution, or human interference could throw the ecosystems of the Great Barrier Reef off balance. Support your answer with evidence from the passage…. Ans: Answers may vary. As an example, students may argue that oil spills near the reef can cause the ecosystems there to be thrown off balance. If the oil kills one species of fish, that may in turn harm another species dependent on it for food or protection. For instance, if clownfish were killed, then sea anemones, which rely on clownfish for defense against other fish and parasites, might die off as well.

Electromagnetic Radiation

Q1. What allows people to see objects?… Ans: D
Q2. What does the author list in the passage?… Ans: B
Q3. What information from the passage best supports this statement?… Ans: D
Q4. Based on the passage, what can be concluded about the ability of humans to see X-rays and gamma rays?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the passage mainly about?… Ans: B
Q6. Read the following sentence: “When you look at a basketball, what are you seeing?”Why might the author have started the passage with this question?… Ans: D
Q7. Humans have invented many tools that allow us to access a wider portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. _, humankind has given itself unique powers for collecting information about the world. … Ans: A
Q8. What is electromagnetic radiation?… Ans: Electromagnetic radiation is a stream of photons that travels in a wave-like pattern, carrying energy, and moving at the speed of light.
Q9. According to the passage, what are televisions, radios, and night-vision goggles all examples of?… Ans: According to the passage, they are all examples of technology that gives us superhuman access to wave frequencies further toward the ends of the spectrum.
Q10. Why might humans want to gain access to a wider portion of the electromagnetic spectrum? Use information from the passage to support your answer… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. For example, students may explain that humans want to gain access to a wider portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in order to learn more about the world. Electromagnetic waves can be thought of as ongoing messages sent out by the universe. The more waves we can access, the more access we have to the information that these waves provide. This would allow us to gain more knowledge about our world which would enable us to better understand the world.

The Most Expensive House In The Universe

Q1. According to the passage, where is “the most expensive house” located? …Ans: C
Q2. Which of the following sequences shows the construction of the ISS in the correct order? … Ans: A
Q3. The countries that worked together to build the ISS did not originally plan to build a shared space station. What evidence from the passage best supports this conclusion?… Ans: D
Q4. What has helped make the ISS mission successful so far?… Ans: B
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: A
Q6. As used in this sentence, what does the word “habitable” mean?… Ans: B
Q7. No individual nation could afford to keep the ISS running properly. __, multiple nations have to work together to fund the ISS.… Ans: C
Q8. What are the three missions of the ISS?… Ans: The three missions of the ISS are to support scientific research, to help astronauts continue to explore space, and to educate the public.
Q9. Why did various governments decide to work together to build the ISS?… Ans: Various governments decided to work together to build the ISS so that they could split the cost of constructing a space station and share resources while onboard the station.
Q10. Aboard the ISS, there is a Japanese-built laboratory called Kibo, which means “hope.” Explain how the ISS and its scientific mission represent or give hope to people around the world. Support your answer using information from the passage…. Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. Students may indicate that the ISS represents hope for people around the world because it is an example of different nations working together towards a common goal, despite cultural differences or disagreements. Because different nations are forced to work together on the ISS, this could lead to better cultural relations. The scientific mission of the ISS gives hope because it promotes scientific research, which can lead to new scientific discoveries that could benefit people around the world. The ISS represents hope because it is such a large-scale endeavor. It shows us that we can achieve amazing things when we work together.

The Creative Path

Q1. How does the author in this passage define “an artist”?…Ans: C
Q2. The passage examines artistry through the perspective of two artists. How is the perspective of the two artists provided in the passage?… Ans: B
Q3. Based on this evidence, what conclusion can be made?… Ans: C
Q4. When asked, “Why is making art important?” Hadar Ahuvia answers by quoting choreographer Martha Graham. Based on this evidence, what conclusion can be made about what Hadar Ahuvia thinks about Martha Graham’s quote?… Ans: B
Q5. What is this passage mainly about?… Ans: D
Q6. What is true about the questions the author posed to both artists?… Ans: B
Q7. Choose the answer that best completes the sentence below.… Ans: A
Q8. According to Hadar Ahuvia, what makes someone an artist?… Ans: According to Hadar Ahuvia, the decision to be an artist is what makes someone an artist.
Q9. According to Paul McLean, what is “the most important drive” an artist can have?… Ans: According to Paul McLean, “the most important drive” an artist can have is an unbreakable resolve to make art.
Q10. In the passage, Paul McLean says that “it doesn’t appear that an artist conforms to any patterning or template, in a one-size-fits-all or machine sort of construct.” How does the author’s interview with the two artists support this conclusion? Use evidence from the text to support your answer…. Ans: • The author’s decision to interview two different artists supports this conclusion because it shows that even two people who consider themselves artists have different opinions and ways of expressing themselves.• Because the author asks both of them the same questions, it is easier to see how they differ.• Because the author interviews two people who have followed their creative paths, the author is able to show that the two artists did not conform to a pattern or template, or follow the same creative paths to get where they are.• The author decides to interview a choreographer and a painter, showing that an artist is not just someone who paints or sculpts.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 9

Below you can find answers for Grade 9 topics:

Roots

>> Find answers here <<

Grandma’s Music

Q1. What kind of music does Ricky like?… Ans: A
Q2. Who are the two main characters in this story?… Ans: C
Q3. What can you conclude about Grandma Johnson and Ricky based on this information? … Ans: A
Q4. What is one reason that Grandma Johnson wants to take Ricky to a Stevie Wonder concert?… Ans: C
Q5. What is one theme in this story?… Ans: C
Q6. What does the word harmonious most closely mean, as it’s used in this sentence?… Ans: C
Q7. At first, Ricky doesn’t think Stevie Wonder’s music is connected to modern music, but _ he realizes that Stevie Wonder’s music has influenced some of his favorite music. … Ans: A
Q8. What is one connection Ricky finds between Stevie Wonder’s music and hip-hop music?… Ans: He finds a connection between Stevie Wonder’s song “Do I Do” and a Ja Rule song. Students may alternatively note that Ricky finds a connection between the song “Superwoman (Where Were You When I Needed You)” and a Frank Ocean song, “Sweet LIfe.”
Q9. How does Ricky’s attitude towards Stevie Wonder’s music change from before the concert to after the concert?… Ans: Before the concert, Ricky is embarrassed to be going to see a concert with lots of older people, and doesn’t think the concert will be very entertaining. After, he thinks that Stevie Wonder’s performance was very exciting, and he finds connections between Wonder’s music and the modern hip-hop music he likes.
Q10. How do Ricky and Grandma Johnson connect through music? … Ans: They connect by teaching each other about the music that they both like, and taking time to listen and learn about new music forms and how they build on each other.

Short Circuits

Q1. According to the text, when was the transistor invented? …Ans: B
Q2. How does the author describe the changes transistors have undergone over time?… Ans: D
Q3. What conclusion can you draw about computers and transistors with this information?… Ans: B
Q4. Based on the text, how does the author likely feel about the future of transistors and nanotechnology?… Ans: A
Q5. What is this text mostly about?… Ans: C
Q6. As used in the text, what does the word “contract” mean?… Ans: C
Q7. If scientists can figure out how to etch transistors onto graphene, _ they will be able to create much smaller and much faster computer chips.… Ans: B
Q8. Based on the text, how are today’s transistors different from the first ones that were invented?… Ans: They are now much smaller. The original ones were about the size of an adult’s fingernail, and now they cannot be seen by the naked eye.
Q9. Based on the text, what are some ways that smaller and cheaper transistors could transform our lives? Use evidence from the text to support your answer…. Ans: Smaller, cheaper transistors could change the way medicine works because smaller transistors could be eaten in a pill or injected, and then could repair damaged cells from the inside of our bodies. They could repair bigger things too, like bridges, airplane engines, and electrical equipment. Additionally, smaller transistors could change housework because they could “eat” dust and clean things efficiently.

19th Amendment

Q1. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed in 1920. What right did it grant to American women?… Ans:
Q2. Identify two important events in the history of the woman suffrage movement prior to the passing of the 19th Amendment.… Ans:
Q3. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans:

Tecumseh

Q1. Who was Tecumseh?…Ans: D
Q2. What sequence of events does the text describe?… Ans: C
Q3. One of Tecumseh’s goals was to stop the loss of Indian land…. Ans: C
Q4. Based on this evidence, who was fighting whom in the War of 1812?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this text? … Ans: A
Q6. What does the word “prophet” mean here?… Ans: A
Q7. Tenskwatawa was a religious leader. Tecumseh, _, was a political leader.… Ans: D
Q8. What did Tecumseh transform his brother’s religious following into?… Ans: Tecumseh transformed his brother’s religious following into a political movement.
Q9. What was Tecumseh’s confederacy?… Ans: Answers should resemble the following. Tecumseh’s confederacy was a group of Indian tribes united to prevent further loss of their lands.
Q10. Evaluate the effectiveness of Tecumseh’s political leadership… Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For example: Tecumseh displayed effectiveness as a political leader. He successfully turned a religious following into a political movement. He also built a confederacy of Indian tribes to resist U.S. expansion. His effectiveness had limits, though. His confederacy was shattered after the destruction of Prophetstown. His leadership of Indian forces against the U.S. in the War of 1812 ended in a retreat. Even so, the quality of his leadership “attracted the attention of friends and foes.”

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 10

Below You Can Find Answers For Grade 10 topics:

The Body Shop

Q1. According to the text, what is one of the best ways to prepare your body for the next workout?… Ans: D
Q2. The author organizes the text by dividing it into sections with subheadings. What is described in the section with the subheading “In the Middle of the Action”?… Ans: C
Q3. What can be concluded based on this information?… Ans: A
Q4. Based on the text, what should a volleyball player probably eat the night before an all-day tournament?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: A
Q6. What does the word “fatigued” probably mean here?… Ans: B
Q7. Refueling during a short workout is not necessary; __, refueling during a long game can be important… Ans: D
Q8. According to Dianne Fagan, what will happen if you are dehydrated?… Ans: Answers should resemble the following. Your energy levels will diminish, and your thought processes and physical performance will be impaired.
Q9. Why might eating chicken breast be a good choice after a workout? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Answers may vary but should resemble the following. Chicken breast is a lump of lean meat that provides protein. Protein helps with muscle building and recovery after a workout. Therefore, eating chicken breast after a workout would help with muscle building and recovery.

Veterans Day Facts

Q1. What is Veterans Day?… Ans: C
Q2. What does the article list?… Ans: C
Q3. Based on this evidence, what might you infer about the importance of Armistice Day to Americans?… Ans: A
Q4. Veterans Day has undergone several changes since it originated in 1919. What evidence from the text supports this statement?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of this text?… Ans: C
Q6. What does “veterans” probably mean here?… Ans: B
Q7. What word could replace “especially” without changing the sentence’s meaning?… Ans: D
Q8. How many military veterans are there in the United States?… Ans: Suggested answer: There are approximately 23.2 million military veterans in the United States.
Q9. Read the paragraph that begins the “Veterans Stats” section of the article. This paragraph describes veterans as “the brave men and women who serve and protect the U.S.” According to the paragraph, who are these brave men and women? Include at least three pieces of information in your answer… Ans: These brave men and women are…- parents.- children.- grandparents.- friends.- neighbors.- coworkers.- an important part of their communities.
Q10. Imagine that you are describing Veterans Day to someone who has never heard of it. What information from the article would you share? In your answer, be sure to explain why you would choose this information to share… Ans: Suggested answer: Answers may vary. Students will likely wish to share information about what Veterans Day is. These students may describe it as a day that “pays tribute to all American veterans.” They may add that it “especially gives thanks to living veterans.” Students may also wish to share information about the history of Veterans Day. They may want to explain its importance too. To do so, they might mention that there are about 23.2 million military veterans in the United States. They might point out that these veterans are parents, children, grandparents, friends, neighbors, coworkers, and an important part of their communities.

Sonnet 73

Q1. What time of year can be seen in the speaker of this poem, based on lines 1-4?…Ans: D
Q2. Which of these rhyming lines appear right next to each other in the poem?… Ans: D
Q3. Based on these lines, what can be concluded about the addressee of this poem, “thou”?… Ans: B
Q4. Based on the poem, how could the speaker be described?… Ans: D
Q5. Which line best expresses the main message of the poem?… Ans: D
Q6. Why might the poet have begun lines 5 and 10 with the same phrase, “In me thou see’st,” but ended the two lines differently?… Ans: B
Q7. What does the phrase “Death’s second self” refer to?… Ans: A
Q8. What three things does the speaker say can be seen in him or her? … Ans: The speaker says that the autumn time of year, the twilight time of day, and the glowing of a dying fire can be seen in him or her.
Q9. Read the last two lines of the poem. In your own words, what do these two lines mean?… Ans: Student answers may vary slightly but should communicate the idea of the final two lines of the poem. Line 13 indicates that the addressee’s love for the speaker is especially strong (“which makes thy love more strong”) because he or she sees that the speaker is at the end of his or her days. The final line expresses the importance of loving someone well when he/she or you will leave (or die) soon.
Q10.Currently, there are no “line breaks” between different parts of the poem. If you were to insert breaks into the poem to separate it into four parts, where would you place those breaks? Be sure to consider rhyme scheme, the completion of sentences in the poem, and the ideas expressed at different points in the poem. Use evidence from the text to explain your reasons for dividing the poem in the manner you choose…. Ans: Students should recognize that the strongest way to separate the poem into four parts would be to insert breaks after lines 4, 8, and 12. These breaks are supported by the rhyme scheme, the placement of periods, and the introduction of different ideas. For example, the first four lines describe the cold autumn season, lines 5-8 describe the twilight of the day, and lines 9-12 describe a dying fire. These are three different images that express the same idea – that the speaker is nearing the end of his or her days. The final two lines deliver a different message, turning the focus to the addressee and expressing the importance of loving someone or something that will leave you soon.

Predicting The Next Pandemic

Q1. According to scientists, what animal is likely to be the source of the next pandemic in people?… Ans:
Q2. Why are scientists working to predict the source of the next pandemic in humans?… Ans:
Q3. What is the main idea of this article?… Ans:

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 11

Below you can find answers for Grade 11 topics:

Civil Rights Act

Q1. What ended segregation in public places and banned employment discrimination?… Ans: B
Q2. The text describes a sequence of events related to the passage of the Civil Rights Act. What happened after the Senate voted 73-27 in favor of the Civil Rights Act?… Ans: C
Q3. Based on the evidence in the text, why might the Civil Rights Act have been necessary?… Ans: A
Q4. How might the Civil Rights Act have empowered African American citizens?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage?… Ans: C
Q6. Based on this evidence, what is the meaning of the word “authorized” in this excerpt?… Ans: B
Q7. __ constitutional amendments gave all men the right to vote regardless of race, many states still used poll taxes, literacy tests, and other similar measures to keep their African American citizens essentially disenfranchised.… Ans: A
Q8. How did states keep their African American residents disenfranchised following the Civil War?… Ans: Many states used poll taxes, literacy tests, and other similar measures to keep their African American residents essentially disenfranchised.
Q9. List two provisions within the Civil Rights Act. Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary slightly but should be supported by the text. In general, they should list two of the following provisions: Under the Civil Rights Act, segregation on the grounds of race, religion, or national origin was banned at all places of public accommodation. The act also barred race, religion, national, origin, and gender discrimination by employers and labor unions and created an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission with the power to file lawsuits on behalf of aggrieved workers. Additionally, the act forbade the use of federal funds for any discriminatory program, authorized the Office of Education to assist with school desegregation, gave extra clout to the Commission on Civil Rights, and prohibited the unequal application of voting requirements.
Q10. Explain how the Civil Rights Act was a “second emancipation.” Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For example: Following the Civil War, a trio of constitutional amendments abolished slavery, made former slaves citizens, and gave all men the right to vote regardless of race. Nonetheless, many states used poll taxes, literacy tests, and other similar measures to keep their African American residents essentially disenfranchised. They also enforced strict segregation through “Jim Crow” laws and condoned violence from white supremacist groups like the Ku Klux Klan. The Civil Rights Act was like a “second emancipation” because, by ending segregation and banning employment discrimination, it fully freed African Americans to be treated equally in the eyes of the law.

Voting Right Act

Q1. What did the 15th Amendment do?… Ans: B
Q2. As described in the text, the Voting Rights Act was a solution created to address what problem?… Ans: C
Q3. Based on the evidence in the text, what inference can you make about the reaction many southern states have had to civil rights laws?… Ans: C
Q4. Why might the number of African American members in the House and Senate have increased between 1965 and 1971?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage? … Ans: C
Q6. Based on this evidence, what is the meaning of the phrase “subjected to” in this excerpt?… Ans: B
Q7. __ African American men were given the right to vote by the 15th Amendment, various discriminatory practices still prevented them from exercising this right.… Ans: A
Q8. What did the Voting Rights Act aim to do?.. Ans: The Voting Rights Act aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the 15th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.
Q9. Describe at least two ways Black people were prevented from exercising their right to vote before the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Support your answer with evidence from the text…. Ans: Students should generally describe two of the following ways Black people were prevented from voting: Black people attempting to vote often were told by election officials that they had gotten the date, time, or polling place wrong, that they possessed insufficient literacy skills, or that they had filled out an application incorrectly. Black people were often forced to take literacy tests, which they inevitably failed. Voting officials had been known to force black voters to “recite the entire Constitution or explain the most complex provisions of state laws,” a task most white voters would have been hard‐pressed to accomplish. In some cases, even Black people with college degrees were turned away from the polls.
Q10. Why might the Voting Rights Act be considered to be among the most far‐reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in U.S. history? Support your answer with evidence from the text. … Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For example: The Voting Rights Act may be considered among the most far‐reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in U.S. history because it vastly improved voter turnout and gave African American voters the legal means to challenge voting restrictions. Although state and local enforcement of the law was weak at first, the act significantly widened the franchise. In Mississippi alone, voter turnout among blacks increased from 6 percent in 1964 to 59 percent in 1969. Additionally, the years after the law was passed saw an increase in African-American representation. In 1965, at the time of the passage of the Voting Rights Act, there were six African American members of the U.S. House of Representatives and no Black people in the U.S. Senate. By 1971, there were 13 Black members of the House and one Black member of the Senate.

The Mayflower

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Measure R

Q1. According to the passage, what must residents of Los Angeles, California, deal with?… Ans: C
Q2. What problem do Measure R and J attempt to address?… Ans: D
Q3. In the passage, the author describes the many hours that it takes for drivers to get across Los Angeles. Based on this evidence, what conclusion can be made?… Ans: A
Q4. How did Angelenos most likely feel in the lead-up to “Carmeggedon”?… Ans: B
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage?… Ans: B
Q6. As used in the passage, what does the word “inefficient” mean?… Ans: A
Q7. There was furor leading up to “Carmaggedon;” _, there was a lack of tension when the closure actually occurred.… Ans: D
Q8. Why is it basically necessary to own a car in Los Angeles?.. Ans: It is basically necessary to own a car in Los Angeles because the city is very spread out and the public transportation is very bad.
Q9. The lead-up to “Carmaggedon” was feverish. Which evidence from the text supports this conclusion?… Ans: In preparation for “Carmageddon,” the mayor of Los Angeles urged residents to leave town; billboards were posted up all over the city warning Angelenos about the coming closure; radio statements were made by all the major radio personalities; one airline offered four-dollar plane rides from Los Angeles to Orange County; bike groups sponsored cross-city excursions; helicopter companies offered half-hour long discounted rides to see the construction in action from the air; and local bars and restaurants offered “Carmageddon” discount specials.
Q10. Why does the author suggest that Los Angeles residents’ experience with years of road closures will pave the way for more support for public transportation expansion and legislation? Use evidence from the text to support your answer… Ans: Students should explain that Los Angeles’ experience with the road closures was more positive than anticipated. Because residents could not drive in the closed areas, the streets were free from traffic and people realized that maybe they didn’t need cars to survive. Because Los Angelenos seemed to welcome the respite from reliance on cars and traffic that the closure afforded them, the author suggests that Los Angelenos will be more willing to support public transportation expansion and legislation so that they don’t have to rely on their cars as much.

 

ReadWorks Answer Key – Grade 12

Below you can find answers for Grade 12 topics:

Selma to Montgomery March

Q1. What did Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference make Selma, Alabama, the focus of?… Ans: A
Q2. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Council responded to fierce resistance to the registration of black voters by organizing a march from Selma to Montgomery. What does the text description is an effect of this march?… Ans: B
Q3. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 forbade discrimination in voting on the basis of race. However, efforts led by civil rights organizations to register black voters were met with fierce resistance in southern states. In Alabama’s Dallas County, the local county sheriff had led a steadfast opposition to black voter registration drives. As a result, only 2 percent of Selma’s eligible black voters had managed to register. What can be concluded about the South’s reaction to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 based on this information from the text?… Ans: B
Q4. Based on the text, why was public awareness of the Selma march important?… Ans: D
Q5. What is the main idea of this passage?… Ans: C
Q6. “Along with the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act was one of the most expansive pieces of civil rights legislation in American history. Its effects greatly reduced the disparity between black and white voters in the U.S. and allowed a greater number of African Americans to enter political life at the local, state and national level.” Based on this evidence, what is the meaning of the word “expansive” in this excerpt?… Ans: D
Q7. __ the Civil Rights Act of 1964 forbade discrimination in voting on the basis of race, efforts to register black voters were still met with fierce resistance… Ans: B
Q8. What effects did the Voting Rights Act have?… Ans: The Voting Rights Act “greatly reduced the disparity between black and white voters in the U.S. and allowed a greater number of African Americans to enter political life at the local, state and national level.”
Q9. What did President Lyndon Johnson do during the march from Selma to Montgomery?… Ans: Answers may vary slightly but should be supported by the text. For example: President Lyndon Johnson backed those marching from Selma to Montgomery and went on national television to pledge his support and lobby for passage of new voting rights legislation he was introducing in Congress. He ordered U.S. Army troops and Alabama National Guard forces to protect the marchers. During the march, he also addressed a joint session of Congress and called for federal voting rights legislation to protect African Americans from barriers that prevented them from voting.
Q10. Explain how the march from Selma to Montgomery helped raise awareness of the difficulty faced by black voters in the South…. Ans: Answers may vary but should be supported by the text. For example: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference organized the march from Selma to Montogomery in order to raise awareness about their voter registration campaign. King’s high profile helped to draw international attention to Selma as did the televised violence against the protesters and President Lyndon Johnson’s support. The historic march helped raise awareness of the difficulty faced by black voters in the South and the need for a Voting Rights Act, which was passed later that year.

Foot Binding

Q1. How did women in China bind their feet?… Ans: A
Q2. What does the author mostly describe in the passage? … Ans: B
Q3. In China, having bound feet was a marker of wealth and status. What evidence from the passage supports this conclusion?… Ans: D
Q4. What is a probable reason for why women’s feet are always concealed?… Ans: C
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: A
Q6. What does “hobble” mean as used in this sentence?… Ans: B
Q7. __ foot binding was promoted as a way to achieve ideal beauty, in reality, it horribly disfigured women’s feet.… Ans: D
Q8. Describe the dangers to a woman’s health that were associated with foot binding… Ans: Health dangers included: gangrene, ulcerations, infections from ingrown toenails or lack of circulation, loss of toes, and possibly death.
Q9. Explain how having tiny, bound feet affected a woman’s reputation and social standing during the height of foot binding in China… Ans: A woman with tiny, bound feet was considered more attractive and ladylike. Foot binding was a symbol of purity and discipline. A woman with bound feet had much better marriage prospects than a woman with natural feet: bound feet increased a woman’s chances of marrying into money and increasing her family’s status and reputation.
Q10. Explain why Chinese mothers allowed their daughters’ feet to be bound despite the pain and the dangers to their daughters’ health… Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. For example, students may explain that Chinese mothers allowed their daughters’ feet to be bound despite the pain and dangers to their daughters’ health because of societal pressure. According to neo-Confucianism, bound feet were the ultimate symbol of purity and discipline. Mothers likely wanted the best social prospects for their children, and a woman with bound feet had a much better chance of marrying into a good family and moving up in society.

The Meteor

Q1. What did Sergei Bobunets witness?… Ans: A
Q2. How does the author describe the meteor strike at Chelyabinsk?… Ans: C
Q3. Which conclusion does this information best support? … Ans: B
Q4. When did the Chelyabinsk meteor most likely contain the most energy?… Ans: D
Q5. What is this passage mostly about?… Ans: C
Q6. What does “mammoth” mean in this context?… Ans: A
Q7. When a meteor explodes in the sky, it radiates its energy in various forms, __ light, sound, and heat.… Ans: D
Q8. What object visible to humans travels the fastest and carries the most energy?… Ans: A meteor is an object visible to humans that travels the fastest and carries the most energy.
Q9. What were the differences between the meteor strikes at Chelyabinsk and Tunguska?… Ans: The meteor that hit Chelyabinsk was much smaller than the meteor that hit Tunguska—57 feet versus 330 feet long. The Tunguska meteor had more energy than the Chelyabinsk meteor—1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima versus 20-30 times more powerful.
Q10. Explain why it is important to study meteors. Support your answer with details from the passage…. Ans: Answers may vary and should be supported by the passage. Students may argue that it is important to study meteors, especially smaller ones like the Chelyabinsk meteor, so that we can learn more about them and prepare ourselves for future meteor strikes. Meteors can be very destructive; it is important that we know how to prepare for one so that we might be able to save lives and limit the damage.

Plymouth Colony

Q1. Who were the “Saints?”… Ans: B
Q2. For the Saints, coming to America was a solution to a problem. What main problem did the Saints face in England and Holland?… Ans: C
Q3. “In fact, without the help of the Wampanoag, it is likely that none of the colonists would have survived.”… Ans: D
Q4. The Saints were strict and devoutly religious. How else could the Saints be described based on the information in the article?… Ans: A
Q5. What is the main idea of this article?… Ans: B
Q6. Read these sentences from the text.“In fact, the Separatists (they called themselves “Saints”) did find religious freedom in Holland, but they…Based on these sentences, what does the word “secular” most nearly mean?… Ans: D
Q7.Read these sentences from the text. Choose the answer that best completes the last sentence… Ans: B
Q8. Why did the Protestant Separatists not want to pledge their loyalty to the Church of England?… Ans: They did not want to pledge their loyalty to the Church of England because they believed it was corrupt and idolatrous.
Q9. Why did the Protestant Separatists, or “Saints,” decide to move to the New World?… Ans: They decided to move to the new world in order to establish a place where they could practice their religion without government interference or worldly distraction, as they had encountered in England and Holland.
Q10. Read these sentences from the text “Still, the Mayflower Saints and their descendants remained convinced that they alone had been specially chosen by God to act…What might Separatist leader William Bradford have meant by this quote? Support your answer using evidence from the text… Ans: Students may indicate that the Separatists moved to the New World to practice their religion freely, and to escape the corruption of the Church of England, so Bradford may have meant that the Saints’ settlement was serving as an example for Christians back in Europe. They may also infer that Bradford meant the Saints’ community was a symbol of light and purity for the world, and that he was suggesting the possibility of future migrants joining the Saints in America in search of a purer, freer religion.

 

About ReadWorks

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ReadWorks Vision

The company’s aim is to ensure that every other child in the United States is able to read well with the help of deep comprehension. All this can be achieved with the help of educators who can teach reading effectively with the help of the expertly formulated reading matter and with the help of the various curricular supports that they need.

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The non-profit ReadWorks is known to partner with K-12 teachers present across the country to solve the country’s literacy crisis. Readworks does this by bridging the large gap present between the research and practice in reading the various comprehensions.

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Hence there is an improvement in classroom level of learning. Hence the company’s reading comprehension system is very good and advanced as well.

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